TODAY ARCHAEOLOGY HAS AN ANSWER FOR EVERYTHING WITHOUT DIGGING – YES, WE HAVE GROUND PENETRATING RADAR IS ANSWER TO GRAVE RESEARCH

Nathan J. Meissner
TODAY ARCHAEOLOGY HAS AN ANSWER FOR EVERYTHING WITHOUT DIGGING

YES, WE HAVE GROUND PENETRATING RADAR IS ANSWER TO GRAVE RESEARCH

Many times people come up with ideas of research but the sites are sacred and cannot be touched. Already the Agha KJhan programme is using radar for research on Lahore Fort. The same can also be used to research the unknown graves within, particularly a grave considered to be that of a Holy Man of the Past. Nothing would be lost or violated but a clearer picture would emerge of the contents of the grave. The same technology can also be used elsewhere. Full research has already been done by others abroad. Such as:

University of Southern Mississippi, Anthropology and Sociology, Faculty Member

Burial Detection Using Ground-Penetrating Radar in Southern Illinois: A Comparison of Historic Cemeteries

Ryan M. Campbell and Nathan J. Meissner The implementation of ground-based geophysical methods for the detection of human burials has become increasingly common in archaeological fieldwork. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) appears to be a useful instrument for cemetery investigations, but the effectiveness of equipment varies by region due to soil differences and other environmental factors. Few region-specific examples are available for comparative purposes, which presents problems for the interpretation of remote sensing data. Here, we present GPR data from three historic cemeteries.

But no one will take that initiative.

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